Wednesday News: Gilead approaches

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SC REPUBLICANS STRIP RAPE AND INCEST EXCEPTIONS FROM ABORTION BAN BILL: A proposal to outlaw abortions in South Carolina after about six weeks of pregnancy got a first round of approval in the state Senate on Tuesday after Senate Republicans removed protections in the bill for women who become pregnant from rape or incest. Those exceptions were added by the S.C. House, which passed the bill earlier this year, after state Rep. Nancy Mace, R-Charleston, told the story of her rape as a 16 year old. Republican Gov. Henry McMaster has said he would sign the bill into law if the Senate passes it. The bill would outlaw the majority, or 55%, of abortions performed in South Carolina. Doctors would face criminal charges for performing abortions after a heartbeat has been detected, typically around the sixth week of gestation — before many women know they are pregnant.
https://www.newsobserver.com/site-services/newsletters/politics-government-nl/article236516018.html

Personal reparations

A post from my wife, Jane Brown
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She calls me her “angel,” “Mom,” or “my only friend.” I’ve asked her not to. Sometimes I’m flattered, happy to be an angel for someone. Other times I feel like it’s just part of the con – a way to get to me, a way to get the money she always so desperately needs.

I first met Mary when she was a housekeeper on campus, responsible for part of the building I worked in. She stayed late one morning to apologize for dropping my wooden horse statue out the window. She said she had opened the window to let some air in and accidentally brushed the horse out the window. It splintered on the bricks below.

I appreciated her apology. She didn’t have to own up to that. We learned each other’s names. She had a big smile and a happy sense to her even though I wondered how she made ends meet. The housekeepers had been in a fight for a living wage for years. Mary was just happy to have a job.

Tuesday News: I have constituents?

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RIP VAN HOLDING ONLY GOT ONE DONATION FROM HIS DISTRICT: Rep. George Holding, a Republican from Raleigh, represents more than 700,000 North Carolinians in Congress in District 2. But in the last three months, only one of those residents has contributed to his 2020 reelection campaign, according to new campaign finance reports. “After voting to strip away health care from North Carolina families and line the pockets of big drug companies, Congressman Holding’s lousy fundraising report proves that his biggest supporters are the wealthy D.C. special interests and not actual North Carolinians,” said Avery Jaffe, a spokesman for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, in an email. The DCCC is a national group that supports Democrats in U.S. House races. Holding’s campaign did not respond to requests for comment about his fundraising or his critics. District 2 encompasses the Wake County suburbs, as well as more rural areas in Harnett, Johnston, Wilson, Nash and Franklin counties.
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/politics-government/election/article236373293.html

Tuesday Twitter roundup

The deadly cost of conservative ideology:

FWIW, the NC House would have passed it, and there are enough votes in the NC Senate for it to pass, but Phil Berger made this life and death decision to block Medicaid Expansion by himself. You look up the word "Hubris" in the dictionary, and it shows his picture in the margin.

Missing vaccinations: The canary in the rural health care coal mine

This is a systemic failure, not a religious backlash:

Pitt County Schools was forced to suspend a number of students who did not receive vaccines after sending warnings to about 300 as a deadline approached last month, officials said.

State law requires students have standard vaccinations in place 30 days after enrollment unless they have a religious exemption. If students do not have the vaccines, they are suspended until they receive them. The number of suspended students was not available at the meeting. The school system did not respond to subsequent requests to provide the information.

Pitt County is actually in better shape coverage-wise than other regional counties, but when you get outside of Greenville, it doesn't seem that way. The lack of vaccinations signals another troubling issue: A lot of the children are not receiving periodic well-care treatment, and that is unsettling, to say the least:

Monday News: Southern discomfort

ARMED CONFEDERATE FLAG SUPPORTERS IN PITTSBORO OUTNUMBERED BY ANTI-RACISTS: Among the groups represented were Heirs to the Confederacy, ACTBAC, CSA II, the Virginia Flaggers and the Hiwaymen, an Arkansas-based group that flocks to far-right events such as Unite the Right in 2017 in Charlottesville, Virginia, which left one counterprotester dead. Under an array of flags, they grilled hot dogs and played country music. About 200 members of antiracist and progressive groups held signs and waved flags on the other side of the road. The group included liberals as well as people further left on the political spectrum, a coalition that was sometimes prickly. Pittsboro locals were joined by people from Hillsborough, Durham and Charlottesville, some of whom also protested Silent Sam, the Confederate monument at UNC-Chapel Hill that activists brought down last year. Saturday’s event was the latest in a series of face-offs in Pittsboro that has left many locals feeling weary. The county commissioners plan to declare the statue public trespass by Nov. 1, making it eligible for removal, The News & Observer has reported.
https://www.newsobserver.com/news/local/article236438178.html

Sunday News: From the Editorial pages

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MEDICAID EXPANSION CAN AND DOES IMPROVE ACCESS TO CARE: Since Medicaid expansions began in 37 other states in the nation, there have been a great number of studies examining what happened. They invariably show that the insurance expansions improved access to care. More than half a million uninsured North Carolinians who could gain insurance if the state expanded Medicaid would be able to afford medical care. This occurred in both urban and rural areas. Part of the answer is that safety net providers, like community health centers, stepped up to the bat to expand capacity, knowing that Medicaid expansions would help make this possible both by increasing Medicaid revenue and reducing uncompensated care pressures. Moreover, many medical practices have learned how to become more efficient and effective, by increasing collaborations with other health professionals, including nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses and care coordinators.
https://www.wral.com/leighton-ku-medicaid-expansion-can-and-does-improve-access-to-care/18700910/

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