More Craziness (This Time Outside of Raleigh)

Pinehurst police officers arrested a man who was hiding in the crawlspace of a woman's house. "He carried a knife, machete, hatchet, saw, power drill, ski mask, gloves, duct tape and ties." Find out what this has to do with Richard Morgan. (Hint: he's not the stalker.)

N&O considers mental health

There's a joke in that headline somewhere, but the subject isn't funny in the slightest. And today's lead editorial in the N&O joins the rising chorus of voices calling for mental health reform. Good on 'em.

North Carolina's mental health system exists to serve fragile people with stubborn, often complicated illnesses. Helping those sufferers isn't cheap, and the costs are driven up even further when help for people with developmental disabilities and drug and alcohol addictions is included.

The state rightly is reforming its system of mental health care delivery, but the complexity of the endeavor means it can't be done in penny-pinching mode. Reform envisioned by the Department of Health and Human Services will keep clients closer to home and give local mental health agencies the money and authority to treat residents in their areas. State-local coordination will be key.

NC Health Care Recommendations: State Health Plan

On April 11, 2006, the North Carolina House Select Committee on Health Care released recommendations for the 2006 legislative short session. Many of them will be controversial, and taken together they have the potential to significantly change the way that North Carolinians access health care and insurance (and how much we pay). Some of these topics are pretty technical, but no less important for their difficulty. I'm hoping that these posts will begin a conversation on the best course for North Carolina's efforts at healthcare reform.

I'll publish the recommendations of the six subcommittees in six posts, along with some of the background information from each report. The subcommittees are:

NC Health Care Recommendations: Access

On April 11, 2006, the North Carolina House Select Committee on Health Care released recommendations for the 2006 legislative short session. Many of them will be controversial, and taken together they have the potential to significantly change the way that North Carolinians access health care and insurance (and how much we pay). Some of these topics are pretty technical, but no less important for their difficulty. I'm hoping that these posts will begin a conversation on the best course for North Carolina's efforts at healthcare reform.

I'll publish the recommendations of the six subcommittees in six posts, along with some of the background information from each report. The subcommittees are:

NC News Wire

I mentioned before the new feature down in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen: the NC News Wire. Here's some more information.

Unlike just about everything else on this site, we don't add any editorializing to the NC News Wire items. It's simply a list of links to articles that are floating to the top of various news searches and that have something to do with North Carolina. This means that you should feel safe putting the News Wire on your own blog, no matter your political inclination. Here's how:

AAA Carolina's Take on the Cost of a Car

One of the biggest enemies of the environment, AAA, has come out with its estimate of the cost to drive a car in North Carolina. Of course, AAA forgot to include the cost of time lost sitting in traffic and the cost to environment, but their data shows that automobiles are very expensive to operate, even though their numbers are greatly skewed.

They estimate that the average car in North Carolina costs $5,711 a year or 53.68 cents/mile. Of this cost, only 10 cents/mile comes from gasoline. And by extension the 2.8 cents/gallon gas tax that Right has been complaining about would account for less than .1 cents/mile.

A Fallen Soldier!

What Is This Picture?

Obviously, it's a picture in a cemetery.  What cemetery and whose grave?  

Sadly, it's the grave of Casey Sheehan.  After two years, and a DoD payment of $250,000 to the "Peace Mom", Cindy Sheehan has not had the time or bothered to have a headstone placed on this young hero's grave.  And, she doesn't even have to pay for one, the DoD will provide one:

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