NCGA

Medical marijuana is a viable alternative to opioids

"Do no harm" is more than just a motto:

A bipartisan effort to legalize marijuana for medical use in North Carolina got a legislative committee hearing on Wednesday. But it's unclear whether enough legislators are ready now to alter their views on pot to make it law.

With nearly three-quarters of states already allowing medical marijuana, senators who unveiled their framework told colleagues the measure takes health and safety seriously while offering palliative care for those with painful or life-threatening illnesses such as cancer.

If you listen to NPR on a regular basis, you may have heard a segment recently about medical marijuana, where they talked about doctors not being exposed to education about the palliative properties of cannabis, even those physicians who were supportive of it. There is a misconception that research in this area is thin and/or not conclusive, but in fact the NIH has compiled the results from several studies:

Gun Culture Club: 300,000 buyers denied by FBI

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A number that is both good and bad:

The number of people stopped from buying guns through the U.S. background check system hit an all-time high of more than 300,000 last year amid a surge of firearm sales, according to new records obtained by the group Everytown for Gun Safety.

The FBI numbers provided to The Associated Press show the background checks blocked nearly twice as many gun sales in 2020 as in the year before. About 42% of those denials were because the would-be buyers had felony convictions on their records.

The bad part: They won't stop trying, and will eventually succeed through private gun sales. Which means, among many other things, that law enforcement won't have a record of the purchase if they need to serve a warrant, or respond to a domestic disturbance. Pretty soon every encounter will be assumed "armed and dangerous," even if there's no record or evidence a gun is present. And you can expect to see this more often:

Charlotte NDO 2.5: This time, with GOP support?

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I'll see your raise, and call. Show me your hand:

Luebke is part of a small group of republicans who've found something that didn't exist before now: republicans on city council supportive of gay rights and protections. They've been working with councilman Tariq Bokhari to put forward their own non-discrimination ordinance, based on conservative values of individual liberty and personal freedom. "I was tired of being caught flat-footed and not being brought to the table as a republican in town," Bokhari said.

Bokhari says the group is pursuing broader and more inclusive protections than the current democratic proposal. It would include protections for accommodations, employment, and housing, and it would also extend protections based on a person's natural hairstyle.

Trying to get a hold of their ordinance proposal itself before commenting further...Okay, here is the proposed ordinance:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

Pope has done a lot of damage, but it's a mistake to drop everything in his lap. The NC GOP has elevated dozens of austerity-loving lawmakers to positions where they could punish the poor with shameless impunity, and we forget those henchmen at our peril. It takes a village (of assholes) to accomplish what they have done, and it will take a concerted effort to fix it.

Blueprint for a more democratic North Carolina

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More than just bullet points:

The more than 20 state and national experts contributing to the report explore initiatives for North Carolina in six areas:

Improving voter registration and list maintenance;
Ensuring voting access and protecting voting rights;
Strengthening local election infrastructure;
Promoting fair redistricting and equal representation;
Heightening transparency and combating corruption;
Ensuring fair and impartial courts.

Looking at #2 & #3 in particular, the NC GOP seems to be doing the exact opposite. They are more concerned about adding vigilantes poll watchers to eyeball and intimidate voters than helping local election boards meet their needs, and now they are moving to block private donors from assisting those folks. Why? Because most of that private funding went to densely-populated areas where that money was needed the most, which just happened to also be heavily-Democratic areas. Let's dig into the report itself to look at list maintenance recommendations:

Tuesday Twitter roundup

They don't want proper oversight, they want partisan oversight. Even if it ends up costing taxpayers millions.

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